Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Pieces of deck

Pieces of deckAnother hard day at the office :)

Here you see the wood so far hacked from my deck, all piled up ready to be taken ashore. There is also another pile at the back, just visible to the left of the crane there.

The small chunks you see in the foreground are the bits prised up from around the studs which did not 'pop' off the deck with the aid of a crowbar.

In volume terms there is not that much more to come off, but the last bits are going to be the toughest, as the difficult to remove bits have been left in favour of ripping out the easier stuff.

My original idea was to take the wood to the tip in my truck, in several loads, which is why it's all cut to such neat lengths.

In reality, seeing the wood stacked like it is, this is probably going to cause issues for me with the tip people when I try to dump such a large quantity of wood.

I'm now thinking of hiring a skip, which would cost about one hundred quid. The skip would save me, and the truck, a fair amount of work and hassle.

13 comments:

  1. Wouldnt a "clearance contractor" take it away amnd burn it for you?

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  2. and for the same price as a skip you could buy a wee cast iron stove and burn it bit by bit and keep toasty warm all winter. Nothing like a proper stove to drive the damp and condensation from a boat

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  3. Re the shoreside trip! if you decide to do it? how about binding (the bigger pieces) and bagging the rest (in sacks)and towing it ashore? (maybe a couple of trips using the rib) initially dropping it all in the water by crane?

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  4. MFV Pasy´s idea is quit right

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  5. Hi Rob

    It will take me some time to fetch it all across, the skip removes any pressure on me.

    I doubt the marina folks would be happy with a pile of dirty old wood cluttering up the place in the meantime.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  6. Hi Mark

    Most of that wood is really filthy with rust and other evil things.

    Burning it in a woodburner is not much of an option.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  7. Hi Rob

    The platform is probably as easy, as it would need to be fished back out on the other side.

    That could end up messy and incurring the displeasure of Southampton's Harbourmaster.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  8. Hi Ib

    Don't forget I have my central heating system.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  9. burnt all of hours - including the oakum, pitch, rotten bits, rusty nails, paint grease and whatever else was on or in it.

    swept the stove out a bout 2 months ago. the whole foredeck including beams filled less than half a carrier bag with ashes and a few rusty nails and screw remnants

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  10. Anonymous4:10 PM

    I'd second the woodburner idea. Free heating for a winter! Any boat bigger than mine (24') ought to have a stove, and yours definitely qualifies. Vital part of a cosy cabin; I have an oil lamp for much the same reason.

    Get thee down to Machine Mart in Portswood for a basic selection of stoves, though there are many more out there both "marine" and non-marine.

    I wouldn't worry about the cleanliness of the wood for burning purposes. It'll still burn. All the ming is going up the chimney, not into your cabin. If it's going nice and hot it'll take a lot of not-particularly-flammable grot up with it. You might have to sieve the odd steel stud out of the ashpan afterwards, but so what.

    Pete

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  11. Anonymous4:27 PM

    PS - Pansy is quite right about a stove drying out damp and condensation - all that air going up the chimney takes the moisture with it. Just heating the place with radiators isn't the same.

    Pete

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  12. When I was a kid the tram tracks were removed from most London boroughs, and in between the tracks were tar blocks, end grain wlm or similar "parque flooring" (spelling soaked) in the droppings of 60 years of oily trams laced with impressed flints etc. We burned them and were thankful for the oportunity. Mind you, you had to be careful with the flying flints when they heated up. I like the idea of a temportary pot bellied stove for the winter but wouldn`t be too happy re the attendance needed, you will be surprised at how quickly the stocks will reduce. If you are going to go this route? get some air circulated around the timber and some cover on it!

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  13. Hi All

    A quick reality check here:

    A woodburner would be great, but installing this equates to another project - I've enough on my plate as it is.

    Besides, there is nowhere sensible for me to store the wood anyway.

    Cheers

    Tim

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