Wednesday, May 05, 2010

The windlass

The windlassHere's the new windlass, in position on the upper deck.

In reality, experience has shown that it's mounted too far forward and actually needs to be mounted on the part of deck behind the wave break you can just see in the picture.

Most of the reason for mounting it there in the first place was that it just seemed to be the right place for it to go. My fault completely.

Still, Seb had an idea I might change my mind and has just tacked it in place for now.

Oh, one small problem I have with it is I can't get the windlass into neutral - it only goes one way. This means the anchor chain cannot get slackened off against it's brake, so as to release the gypsy dogs, meaning pulling the anchor up is easy, but letting it drop again is a small problem.

Anyone out there have any ideas?

14 comments:

  1. Anonymous3:09 PM

    It looks like relocating it will be a big deal. You would have to reconfigure your hawsepipe as well, with some sort of guide to take the chain from horizontal to vertical.

    I gather that there should another set of dogs acting on the chain itself -- I do not see anything in your picture, but I suppose a largish bolt through one of the links might jam against the top of the hawsepipe and act as a dog to hold the chain and take the tension off the gypsy.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Anonymous

    Not that much of a big deal to relocate.

    The issue is with all the weight of the anchor on the chain, and no relief possible, disengaging the dog to allow the weight of the anchor onto something else is not possible. Not that I can see anyway.

    What I need is some way to put the whole mechanism into reverse, so the weight of the anchor can be transferred off the engine.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  3. Guess we should move it aft of the breakwater thingy after all. Bollocks. No big deal- hey ho, I'll be happy to come down next time I'm free from work and give you a hand repositioning the bugger if you want, you may have to wait for me a few weeks though, as I'm about to be doing that job I told you about.
    While we're at it making a new and proper sled for the whole show would probably be quite wise.
    Maybe the hawse pipe issues solveable with a heavy (like 1 inch plus) shoe welded around where the chain rubs? If not making a more sophisticated chute type guide would be no probs. As for the navel pipe (the one the chain passes through into the locker, knew I'd remember it's name eventually, well, you know that's an easy one.
    As for the lack of neutrality. Hmmm, have you had a look inside the gearbox on the lister yet? or is that a really stupid question?

    regards, Seb

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Seb

    Yup, your help with that would be greatly appreciated.

    A shoe thingy would be best I'm thinking.

    Stripping all that stuff for neutrality has not been a priority.

    Cheers

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous4:00 PM

    I am a little mystified by all of the complexities of setting up the anchor tackle for Lady Jane. It seems that every part -- the anchor, chain, box, windlass -- it's all new. I take it that LJ was not originally equipped with any sort of anchor. Is that right?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Anonymous

    So far as I know, she had no anchor setup, instead I presume they would have used the net gear to deploy/recover an anchor if needs be.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm a little more of a visual person myself but perhaps this picture looks a little like the setup on the Steve Irwin.
    I remember seeing this picture a while back and it looks fairly similar to the setup you are leaning toward.
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_DDj7QrYyvek/S5HZ6D_R6CI/AAAAAAAAAnQ/e_gsIkUMAyQ/s1600-h/100305_BV_HobartArrival-1392.jpg

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous11:02 PM

    Yes, you need this sort of set-up. Notice the clamp things (pawl bar) that can swing across on top of the chain and be screwed down to secure the chain to the chain guide.

    Maybe the used chain folks can set you up with a ready made chain guide with pawl bars and a devil's claw and all that stuff. It does not look too hard to fabricate, but buying one ready made would be simpler.

    I think operating the anchor tackle is pretty dangerous -- there's a lot of heavy metal flying about -- and I think you want properly engineered kit involved as much as possible.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Dont you just release the brakes on the drums either side and the chain just "forges forth" out of the tube isn`t there a pawl or auto cluch built in somewhere that allows it to, only free wheel one way? (out) and then on the inward haul a manual quick release sort of "devils claw? " is applied after the engine has been stopped and the brakes have been applied? The brakes are then released to take up any slack on the devils claw attachment/chain and keep it tight and the brakes are them again applied? That size of winch usually relies on a chain connection, direct to the winch, or another strong point,with a short section of chain or a "Gismo/devils claw" that can be knocked free with a hammer so that the chain releases and runs out freely, Mind you you need to be a bit nifty having knocked the shackle open, as you don`t want a heap of chain on top of the anchor on the bottom so you need to be moving slowly when you hit the easy release shackle pin (sorry the correct name eludes me,Seb or John will know, at the moment)and quickly control the outgoing chain with the brakes so that the anchor is clear of chain on top of it. The hole in the chain Hawse can be filled with a little spray foam out of a can which will stop the rain water getting in the chain locker, and will pull free at any sign of the chain being deployed. don`t forget to mark the chain in depth colours, I use the colours of the rainbow for every ten metres ROYGBIV 70 metres then add black to each for 140 metres, or two blacks for 210 metresshould you ever need it? chain "scope" is best 6 times depth maybe more in bad weather. but I`m sure that there is a recognised marking for the purist? I just find the rainbow coulrs and the black tags easiest to remember and with just three colours red yellow and blue you can mix all the colours!plus black (neutral) I`ve rambled a bit tim sorry :o(( by the way anchoring isn`t for the faint hearted or first timer! people can get injured, not to mention deafened. be careful while you sort it out, goes without saying really, as I am sure you will.Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Marc

    The windlass on the Steve Irwin is similar, though looks a bit bigger.

    That's the setup I need to move to, with the winch set further back.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Anonymous

    The dangerous bit I get, the forces involved are huge.

    I've already discovered the winch can bend a shackle like it's made of cheese.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Rob

    I'll need to read your rambling again, but I have the claw thing which I thought was a kind of safety break.

    Maybe I do another post on this.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous3:10 PM

    Captain Cautious here, putting in a quick sneaky visit since i transferred my allegiance to Seb.The royal navy use a stenhouse slip which is shackled to a secure point on deck then it passes through the chain and back onto itself the arm is then secured with a small ring.When the big hairy skipper(thats me!!) shouts to the lowly crew(thats you lot!!)let go! you, release the brake, bash the ring, and the chain rushes out at rate of knots, thence controlled by a rating on the brake until sufficient is let out and she is brought up snug as a bug.A shiny black ball is hoisted to denote vessel is at anchor,The skipper then retires to his cabin for a well earnt bath, followed by tea and a blueberry muffin.The crew having given three hurrahs for the skipper then relax by scrubbing decks while singing rousing rollicking shantys.Happy Days!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi John

    That all sounds far to easy!

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete