Tuesday, May 04, 2010

Ladder

Ladder lowI'm posting this because I've been asked, and because it's interesting (to some at least).

Here's the ladder at low tide. It's a bit of a steep climb, but perfectly alright. What makes climbing the ladder at this state of the tide fun is if the wake from a big boat going by rolls Lady Jane some. You definitely get that 'going to tip over' feeling.

The ladder is normally stowed resting up against the wheelhouse roof when it's not in use, so it does not chafe needlessly. The blue rope you see is to retrieve the ladder from the quay.

Ladder highHere's the ladder at high tide. Lady Jane is floating close up to the quay wall in this picture.

Oddly enough, I find negotiating the ladder at high tide the hardest, as I've not got the courage to walk across it and Lady Jane is often floating away from the quay side, making jumping across pretty 'interesting'.

Oh, and before you ask, that ladder is 3.4m long (10 ft).

12 comments:

  1. Hi Tim,

    Have you tried putting a plank or some other kind of board on the ladder when it is mostly horizontal ?

    Bill Kelleher

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  2. Hi Bill

    I have - a plank with clips either end, so as to avoid a 'Laurel & Hardy' moment if the end of the plank gets stood on while it's unsupported!

    I've just not got a round tuit.

    Regards

    Tim.

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  3. Anonymous2:54 PM

    captain cautious here,the original nagging nautical know all!I recall a seaman would should have paid more attention in class who decided to end it all,he took a long rope from the end of the aft derrick attached it to his neck and climbed up high before leaping off.we found him in the morning with two broken legs!! he didnt measure the rope???this of course has no bearing at all on your boarding problem,but the cautionary tale should lighten somebodys day!!and I tim will board from the wet side as it looks safer!!

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  4. Fred (WWR)2:29 AM

    Ahhh!! Good old duct tape :) In your refinements are you considering a couple of U-bolts to hold that together? Is there a rod of some sort passing through the lower rung?

    That horizontal position seems it could be good practice for crossing crevasses of glaciers.

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  5. Hi Fred

    I'd tied the ladder to the 2*2's pretty well with wire.

    As I'm likely not going to be at the quay for much longer, a more permanent solution seems unnecessary.

    Regards

    Tim

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  6. Hi John

    It's as safe as I can make it, and so much better than the old ladder.

    Regards

    Tim

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  7. Anonymous9:46 AM

    Hi Tim,for sheer wit,wisdom and sage advice captain cautious could not be beaten but as it was lost on you lot he has now retired.I am sailing saturday so if the wind is fair we may pay a visit.ADIEU CaptainCautious you will be sadly missed!!!( if you thought you had a looney in the wheelhouse ,this confirms it!!)

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  8. Wow, that just looks scary at any angle.I always had an armload or two everytime I came home. I can't imagine trying to haul myself and my groceries etc up that ladder.

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  9. Tim, can you post a couple of pics of your ladder at high tide? The low tide situation seems a bit scary and, like Rhianna said, bringing even smallish stuff on board becomes a problem. How'd you manage?

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  10. Hi John

    Maybe see you Saturday - winds depending of course.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  11. Hi Rhianna

    I've a small rucksack I use for the smaller stuff, but that's why I got the hoist working properly.

    It's a hassle to use, but so much easier and safer than carrying stuff up and down the ladder.

    Regards

    Tim

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  12. Hi Dennis

    The second picture shows the ladder at high tide - quite a difference.

    Regards

    Tim

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