Thursday, March 25, 2010

Windlass project

New windlassThis picture shows the culmination of a mass of organisation, and help from a lot of people, but by no means the end of this particular project.

This actually started back in February 2007, when I finally got to realise that buying chain for a windlass was not as straightforward as I first thought. Also, truth be told, that manual windlass has always been a little on the small side.

I've not worried too much about a windlass, as Lady Jane has not been out in the last year anyway, but Andrew Tognola, as the result of selling of his boat, asked if I was interested in his windlass before he put it onto e-bay.

After a trip to Oxford to check out the windlass, I decided it was too much money for the time and effort involved in getting it on board.

As things turned out, the windlass did not sell on e-bay so I was again offered it by Andrew at a much reduced price which I could hardly refuse.

The windlass also came with a big stack of chain and two anchors - all matching which, as I've discovered, is the important bit.

Getting the windlass from Andrew's yard in Oxford onto Lady Jane's foredeck has taken a while.

First I had to figure out getting the windlass on board. I ended up getting quotes from a few places near me capable of hoisting the hefty lumps on board. Doing a lift mid-river was just impractical.

Next was to co-ordinate with John, the skipper, for a suitable time in amongst his work commitments which would fit with the yard doing the lifting.

I also had to arrange for someone else to help crew Lady Jane - as you see from the picture, Seb from Wendy Ann rose to the occasion.

Finally was to arrange road transport with lifting capability at least on the Oxford end.

A huge thanks to everyone who helped with all aspects of the operation, especially Andrew for his help in loading the stuff onto the truck, John for a sterling job skippering in tricky circumstances and Seb for his tireless and cheerful assistance.

12 comments:

  1. Anonymous1:26 PM

    now listen up ! its a windlass.I appreciate the trying cicumstances remark,my doctor reckons I can be weaned off the Valium in a year or so!! regards john

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  2. What a great post! "I just love it when a plan comes togeather"

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  3. Hi John

    Ok, fixed.

    Thanks

    Tim

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  4. WOW, Nice Pice !
    I understan You´v got the "must have feeling".............

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  5. Anonymous6:49 PM

    What a wonderfully "boaty" bit of kit that is. Where will it actually go? It looks like it has to sit on deck, but it has (yet another) engine and looks like it would prefer to be under cover from the elements.

    I can't wait for all the follow on installation activities.. Thanks Tim!

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  6. That is a serious windlass, what size chain does the gypsy take?

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  7. Hi Rob

    There is some way to go before it all completely comes together.

    The shipping bit all worked out beautifully though.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  8. Hi ib

    I see having a good windlass as pretty essential if I'm going to start using the old girl a bit more.

    It's been somewhat like driving a car without a proper handbrake all this time.

    Regards

    Tim

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  9. Hi Anonymous

    Plenty of follow on activities, that is sure.

    Cheers

    Tim

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  10. Hi Fran

    Next post is the chain on deck...

    Cheers

    Tim

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  11. Anonymous10:04 AM

    The Lister engine driving the windlass are still made in Gloucester England and exported all over the world.I had one free standing in a workshop and when the notion struck me I would fire it up and leave it run a while.Being free standing it would wander around the shop floor and now and then would drift across and give the back of my legs a nuzzle! Who says that engines are not romantic??? regards John

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  12. Hi John

    Hmm nuzzled by a Lister!

    Cheers

    Tim

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