Friday, March 26, 2010

Chains and stuff

Chains and stuffHere you see the chain and one of the pair of anchors that were also delivered.

Seb enthusiastically set about flaking out the new chain on Lady Jane's deck, assisted by John and myself. As John, Seb and I can attest, there is miles of very heavy chain there.

With all the chain laid out, we discover there were two good long lengths piled in there. I'm starting to think about storing the one down below and, once the windlass is welded into place, connecting up the best one.

The anchor you see in the foreground is seized, so that needs some work. However the anchor Robin fitted is a similar size, so I'll continue to use that one and keep the others as spares for now.

You can also see a huge pile of boards on deck in the background there, Andrew chucked those in for free as he no longer needs them. Trouble is I've no space to put them, so will need to think about what to do with them.

I'm hoping the weather will be kind these next few weekends while I sort this all out.

11 comments:

  1. Sorry about all the work Tim !!

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  2. Looks like you have your work cut out for you, good score though!

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  3. Hi Andrew

    The work never stops:)

    Cheers

    Tim

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  4. Hi Rhianna

    It's fun though!

    Cheers

    Tim

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  5. Anonymous2:47 PM

    Would there be a point in joining the two pieces of chain together? You would likely want a chain-maker or someone skilled in the art to do that, I guess, which would mean transporting the chain, which would be impossible, essentially.

    I could picture using acetylene to cut and re-weld one of the links. Maybe one of your welding friends could take care of that on-site.

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  6. Hi Anonymous

    After discussion, a longer chain may prove too much for the windlass.

    Trouble is, the only way to find out is to possibly loose the lot!

    Cheers

    Tim

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  7. Dear Tim,
    how on earth will we lose the lot if you'll have first shackled the loose end of the chain to a strong point inside the chain locker?

    Can't wait to see the anchor weighed for the first time...

    regards, S.

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  8. snowbiker5:13 AM

    Seb -- I think you two could lose the lot if you put all the chain down in deep water, couldn't get it back up, and then found Lady Jane didn't have enough oomph to drag the chain into shallow enough water to manage to lift the fraction not on the seafloor. Or if it got fouled on rocks while dragging to shallower water or something.

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  9. snowbiker5:25 AM

    But one thing you could try, in not-so-deep water, would be to make/find some sort of basket that could bear the weight of pretty much all of the chain. Put the basket underwater below the hawse-pipe, and make sure the basket support line is well attached to the boat somehow. Pay out chain into the basket, then from a dingy or something link an alternate basket support line/cable to the anchor chain. You could test if the engine could pull up the whole basket a few feet .... Easy to add/remove chain from the basket.

    Now making such a substantial "basket" would be difficult, but maybe you could find / repurpose something?

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  10. Anonymous3:06 PM

    I think the best way to determine if the windlass has the lifting capacity for a given amount of chain should involve (1) contacting the manufacturer or a dealer in this sort of windlass to find the design capacity of this particular unit, and (2) determine the weight of the chain either from tables or by weighing some links. For extra points compute the weight of chain in seawater. Then (3) compare, and/or calculate the length of chain that it can handle.

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  11. All

    I'm not too bothered about the additional chain.

    The one piece is plenty long enough for the foreseeable future.

    Cheers

    Tim

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