Thursday, October 15, 2009

Rust busting

Rust bustingA bit of a contrast to the last post!

It's been a while since I've been down on my hands and knees chipping rust, now the muscles in my arms are paying the price.

The rust on the port side there is really the result of not doing the job properly the first time round.

Originally, while in Fareham, we just painted over the rusty bits. Now it's time to do the job properly (see the rust bleeding through on the extreme right of the picture).

Just the short(ish) stretch you see there has almost filled up that 20L tin in the foreground.

That's on top of the chippings Fred produced from this section almost a year ago now.

9 comments:

  1. You really are getting stuck in to a great deal of work. It must be very satisfying though when everything is finally white and gleaming. Keep it up, but make sure you make time for a good, muscle relxing soak.

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  2. Anonymous9:57 AM

    What size is your compressor? Might be time to invest in the sandblasting attachments - once you've used grit you won't go back to the alternatives. Not as messy nor noisy as you'd expect - probably less so than what you're doing at present - and leaves a lovely finish. And you can reuse the same grit several times.

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  3. Anonymous7:50 PM

    ..and you can run all sorts of lovely tools from compressed air. My vision has been a large capacity compressor in the engine room that runs from the aux engine, with compressed air plumbed to a couple of key points (workshop under the whaleback). Needle hammers, grinders, sanders, paint sprayers and sandblasting then runs off the compressed air.

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  4. Ooh you are so lucky if you can make noise getting rust off and no one minds! What are you using to do it with? I have a needle scaling hammer (using compressed air), but the darn thing is so noisy I'm only allowed to use it in certain parts of the harbour. It's a great tool, so I can highly recommend it. As anonymous says, sand blasting is the best, but we aren't allowed to do that here in NL. Environmentally unacceptable apparently.

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  5. Hi Anonymous

    I fear sandblasting would be far too messy.

    I don't have the facilities to contain this.

    When LJ eventually does come out of the water, I'll probably use ultra high pressure water blasting to clean up her hull.

    Regards

    Tim

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  6. Hi Fran

    It's a pretty long haul this...

    Plenty of time for barbecues and soaks.

    In fact, when I get back from LJ after a few days graft, a soak is pretty much mandatory now.

    Regards

    Tim

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  7. Hi Anonymous

    The boat has a great compressor which runs via the donkey engine, and I also have a smaller one for general purpose work.

    In truth though, I've found is far more practical to use the electric equivalent of the various compressed air tools (except spray painting), as they are easier to setup and, overall, need less power to run them.

    Regards

    Tim

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  8. Hi ValleyP

    I wouldn't say nobody minds!

    It's just that Lady Jane is moored in an industrial area, so noise is all about anyway.

    For the sake of good neighbourliness I do try to make most of the noise during the week and on Saturday mornings.

    From my time in Fareham, I completely understand how frustrating it is to have to be quiet when you have jobs to be getting on with.

    Regards

    Tim

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  9. ValleyP

    One other thing, I've tried the air scaler (a few different sizes) and it is just not effective.

    What works well is to use a compressed air hammer (small and light) with a fairly small pointed tip to really get into the embedded rust.

    The best I've found is that Hilti breaker you can see lying on the deck there. I use different sized and shaped tips for the best results.

    The small tips are great for really getting the stubborn bits of rust out, while the larger tips are great for paint and large areas of rust scale.

    Regards

    Tim

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