Monday, August 24, 2009

The Old Sow

The old sow - a dirty bottomGiving the Old Sow some tender loving care in the bottom department has been long overdue.

My experience with jetwashing the underside of the rib has taught me that the underside of boats that stay in the water for any length of time need regular cleaning. The more often the better.

The build up of marine growth you see attached to the Old Sow is an indication that I've let things go just a little too long.

The old sow - Fred is in thereMy old jetwash was useless, so I had to start this particular task with the purchase of a brand new one. I've already killed two Karcher jetwashes in the time I've had Lady Jane, so opted for a Bosch one this time. Only time will tell if it's going to survive.

Early indications are that it's a good one. So good in fact that I think I'm going to have to hide it from Fred, who you can only just see through all the spray there, as he seems inordinately fond of jetwashers.

The old sow 3 - ready for actionThe net result of all this blasting away at the poor unsuspecting critters that had made the underside of the old sow their home is a transformed old sow.

Initial testing has the sow once more skimming gracefully upon the ocean wave... Get real - it's still a pig, but a clean one.

One thing though, there seems to be seawater coming in from somewhere now. It's probably from the fitting for the home made bars the previous owner put on.

That's boats though - always something...

9 comments:

  1. Tim,
    You might want to take a close look at the seams where you jet washed.

    You might have pulled one apart

    Bill Kelleher

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  2. Hi Bill

    I'm pretty confident it's not the seams, they all looked in good shape.

    If you look at the very bottom right hand side of the top picture, you can just see a rusted bolt through the transom which sits just on/below the waterline.

    That bolt holds the frame you can see extending upwards from it (with the rope around it). For some reason, this was bolted below the waterline.

    I suspect the rust has been cleaned off of that & now it leaks, as there is no any sign of any rubber seal there.

    A few lumps of steel in the front of the old sow, bringing that bolt out of the water, virtually stops the leak. This lends weight (ho ho) to this theory.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  3. Tim,
    Sounds good to me.

    I am replacing a 32volt battery charger in my boat.

    The darn thing weighs 65lb.
    and goes on a bulkhead that is hard to get to.

    Boat are so much fun. LOL

    Bill Kelleher

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Bill

    Yup, it always seems that the worst to get at stuff that's the most trouble.

    The same stuff never gets properly fixed because of that.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jack

    Thanks for your comments - they are welcome. However, please do not advertise here - it's not appropriate.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Tim

    What happened to the rib ?

    Andrew

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Andrew

    The rib is languishing at home.

    I've still not quite got round to fixing the steering yet.

    Regards

    Tim

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  8. We had a couple of electric pressure washers and it wasn't so much that they went kaput is the cheap plastic fittings broke off. Of course the gas ones have more jam and if you get the turbo nozzles (made of porcelain) they do a pretty bang up job.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Bowiechick

    The new jetwash is still an electric one. I thought that a petrol (gas) one would be a little over the top for the amount I'd use it.

    I've also got to think about water consumption, as it's all got to be carried out Lady Jane.

    Regards

    Tim

    ReplyDelete