Thursday, June 25, 2009

Lilagina leak

LilaginaThe wooden boat in front of Lady Jane there is Lilagina. She is, obviously, quite old.

Anyway, she has been pretty much neglected these past years and recently her owner was called, informing him she was starting to sink.

Graham, her owner, had apparently pumped out about 10 tonnes of water and had to keep pumping to stay ahead of the leak she seems to have sprung.

The last time I saw Graham, he told me he had pushed a wad of sawdust from the seaward side into the area where the leak was, using a broom handle and a rolled up carpet full of the stuff.

Apparently, the sawdust gets pulled into the leak with the water flowing into the boat, catches, expands and stops the leak.

That sounds just so amazing to me.

While I'd rather not have a wooden boat with a leak in the first place, knowing something as simple as that could make all the difference while arrangements for a more permanent repair are made.

8 comments:

  1. We used to dive over the side of our wooden boat with a box of sawdust and ( by shaking it out of the box) let it float to the surface across any areas where we expected it to be leaking and it would be sucked into the leaking seam. We would then take time to re caulk it at low tide, but the saw dust used to help reduce the ingress of water some.

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  2. What an innovative idea, I would never have thought of something like that, but can see how it would work. Thanks for sharing that tidbit, never know when it might come in handy.

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  3. Hi Rob

    It's a very impressive trick.

    Regards

    Tim

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  4. Hi Cyberangel

    I presume that shipwrights of old learnt that fairly early on, most likely by chance.

    Regards

    Tim

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  5. The other one of course is hauling a sail over the opening from the outside. The water flowing in pulls it into the gap, and modern sailcloth is waterproof to a degree. Of course, a motor trawler like Lilagina isn't necessarily going to have a sail handy...

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  6. Hi Pete

    I think that may be Graham's next move, as he's waiting on big springs in the next few weeks to get her onto the public slip to effect a more permanent repair.

    Regards

    Tim

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  7. or to place a sail into the bilge and by using a pump, suck out the water local to the leak only and in doing so pull the sail cloth across the leaking area. sort of compartmentalise the water and pump it out as it comes in.

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  8. Anonymous11:09 PM

    lilagina used to live up the river hamble,she was much admired for her sweet lines and her fit out below was very well done,but the best bit is her lovely kelvin engine,how i would love to see that engine out of her and somebody finding a nice hull for it,but as is the way of things unless somebody takes charge of her that lovely engine will end up on the seabed,how come there is never a lottery win around when you want one!! regards john

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